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To the speakers and all who attended, Thank You!

 The 2012 Nova Scotia Summit on Gifted Education and Talent Development was a great success.  Thank you to all who participated.  This event website will remain online for archival purposes.  Please see the Keynote Speakers, Daily Featured Speakers and Breakout Session Speakers pages to download each speakers presentation.  They will be posted as we receive them.

 

Dr. Joseph Renzulli (Keynote Opening Handout (PDF)  |  Keynote Closing Handout (PDF))

dr-joseph-rensulliDr. Joseph Renzulli is the Neag Professor of Gifted Education and Talent Development at the University of Connecticut where he also serves as the Director of The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented. He has spent his 40-year career in research focused on the identification and development of creativity and giftedness in young people and the use of gifted education pedagogy to increase engagement and achievement for all children. He has worked on the development of organizational models and curricular strategies for differentiated learning environments that contribute to total school improvement.  A focus of his work has been the application of the pedagogy of gifted education to the improvement of learning for all students. His work on the Enrichment Triad Model was one of the first efforts on problem-based learning in the 1970's and his work on curriculum compacting and differentiation were pioneering efforts in these areas in the 1970's.

In March of 2000, Joe was named a Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor at the University of Connecticut, an honor given to only three professors each year.  He has served on numerous editorial boards in the fields of gifted education, educational psychology and research, and law and education.  He also served as a Senior Research Associate for the White House Task Force on Education for the Gifted and Talented.  Dr. Renzulli is a Fellow in the American Psychological Association, and he has received distinguished research awards from the National Association for Gifted Children and the University of Connecticut.

His major research interests are in identification and programming models for both gifted education and general school improvement. His Enrichment Triad Model (1977) has been cited as the most widely used approach for special programs for the gifted and talented, and the Three Ring Conception of Giftedness, which he developed in the early 1970s, is considered by many to be the foundation of a more flexible approach to identifying and developing high levels of potential in young people.  Prior to Dr. Renzulli's work on this definition, which is widely accepted and cited, most professional educators equated giftedness with high IQ scores, but Dr. Renzulli's work challenged conventional wisdom and opened up gifted programs to children of poverty, children from bilingual backgrounds, and children of color.

Dr. Joseph Renzulli has contributed hundreds of books, book chapters, articles, and monographs to the professional literature and has been a series author with the Houghton Mifflin Reading Series.  A few of his books are Schools for Talent Development:  A Practical Plan for Total School Improvement (Renzulli, 1994), The Schoolwide Enrichment Model: A How-To Guide for Educational Excellence (Renzulli & Reis, 1997), and The Total Talent Portfolio:  A Systematic Plan To Identify and Nurture Gifts and Talents (Purcell & Renzulli, 1998).  Although Dr. Renzulli has generated millions of dollars in research and training grants, he lists as his proudest professional accomplishments the annual summer Confratute Program at the University of Connecticut, which originated in 1978 and has served more than 25,000 persons from around the world; and the establishment of the UConn Mentor Connection, a summer program that enables high potential high school students to work side-by-side with leading scientists, historians, artists, and other pioneering faculty members at the University of Connecticut. 

Look in the index of almost any book published during the past 30 years on gifted and talented education and the application of gifted education pedagogy to all children, and chances are the most frequently mentioned name is that of Dr. Joseph Renzulli. Considered by many to be the world's leading scholar on the topic, Dr. Renzulli has spent almost 40 years conducting the research that has earned him an international reputation. His books and articles have been translated into over 15 languages and he has lectured in approximately 30 countries.

Dr. Renzulli has won many professional awards over the years and is listed in American Men and Women of Science Who's Who, the International Scholar's Directory, Leaders In Education, Who's Who Among Authors and Journalists, Who's Who Guide To Child Development Professionals, and Who's Who In the East. In recent years, he won the Excellence in Research Award from the University of Connecticut Alumni Association (1993) and was awarded The Raymond and Lynn Neag Chair in Gifted Education and Talent Development, University of Connecticut (1996).  He won the Ruth A. Martinson Award for Significant Contributions in the Education of the Gifted from the California Association of Gifted (1997). and was honoured with the Distinguished Service Award from the National Association for Gifted Children (2001). Dr. Renzullli won the Neag School of Education - Outstanding Research Award in 2002, and in 2003 was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Law Degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada. In 2003, he also won the E. Paul Torrance Creativity Award from the National Association for Gifted Children. In August of 2005, he was awarded the Harry Passow Award for Leadership in Gifted Education by the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children. He also won the Ann F. Isaac's Founders Memorial Award from the National Association for Gifted Children and in April, 2008, he was named an AERA Fellow.

His 1978 article entitled called “What Makes Giftedness” has been cited as the most frequently referenced article in the field.  Dr. Renzulli is Fellow in the American Psychological Association, a former president of the Association for the Gifted, and he has served on the editorial boards of Learning Magazine, the Journal of Law and Education, Exceptionality, and most of the national and international journals dealing with gifted education.  He has worked with numerous schools and ministries of education throughout the U. S. and abroad. His most recent work is a computer-based assessment of student strengths integrated with an Internet based search engine that matches enrichment activities and resources with individual student profiles. The American Psychological Association's Monitor on Psychology named Dr. Renzulli among the 25 most influential psychologists in the world.

The programming model he developed with Dr. Sally Reis has been credited as the most widely used approach by schools throughout the world that serve talented students and seek to enrich and engage all students in enrichment opportunities. Dr. Reis, a past president of the National Association for Gifted Children and also a widely cited author, is a leading authority on gifted women, underachievers, and reading strategies for gifted children. These two scholars have given thousands of presentations in the United States and overseas, and their work has defined present day identification and programming practices for the gifted.  Recently, Drs. Renzulli and Reis have adapted their ideas previously available through writings and training seminars for professionals and incorporated new research in a book that will speak to parents committed to developing their children's gifts and talents.

 

Dr. Sally M. Reis (Keynote Opening Handout (PDF)  |  Keynote Closing Handout (PDF))

dr-sally-reis.jpgSally M. Reis is a Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor at The University of Connecticut and the past Department Head of the Educational Psychology Department at the University of Connecticut where she also serves as a Principal Investigator for the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented.  She was a teacher for 15 years, 11 of which were spent working with gifted students at the elementary, junior high, and high school levels.  She has authored or co-authored over 250 articles, books, book
chapters, monographs and technical reports. Her most recent work is a computer-based assessment of student strengths integrated with an Internet based search engine that matches enrichment activities and resources with individual student profiles [www.renzullilearning.com].

Her research interests are related to special populations of gifted and talented students, including: students with learning disabilities, gifted females, and diverse groups of talented students. She is also interested in extensions of the Schoolwide Enrichment Model for gifted and talented students and as a way to expand offerings and provide general enrichment to identify talents and potentials in students who have not been previously identified as gifted.  She is the Co-Director of Confratute, the longest
running summer institute in the development of gifts and talents. She has been a consultant to numerous schools and ministries of education throughout the U. S. and abroad and her work has been translated into several languages and is widely used around the world.

She is co-author of The Schoolwide Enrichment Model, The Secondary Triad Model, Dilemmas in Talent Development in the Middle Years, and a book published in 1998 about women¹s talent development entitled Work Left Undone: Choices and Compromises of Talented Females. Sally serves on several editorial boards, including Gifted Child Quarterly, and is a past President of the National Association for Gifted Children. She has been honored with the highest award in her field as the Distinguished Scholar of the National Association for Gifted Children and named a fellow of the American Psychological Association.

 

Dr. Rachel McAnallen

dr-rachel-mcanallen.jpgTeaching Fun, Engaging, and Challenging Math Lessons (Day 2, morning Keynote)

Known simply as “Ms. Math” to children across the United States, Rachel McAnallen has devoted her life to sharing the joy and beauty of mathematics with learners of all ages.  A professional educator for over half a century, she travels the globe teaching her subject at every grade level. In addition to her experience in the classroom, Rachel has served as a department chair, a school board member, and a high school administrator— she claims the latter position is responsible for the majority of her gray hairs.  

Rachel has a passion for teaching, golf, and mathematical modular origami, though not always in that order.  As a life-long learner, she has completed her PhD at the University of Connecticut at age 75.  Rachel approaches the world around her with a boundless curiosity and a playful sense of humor that is reflected in her teaching style. Her teaching philosophy exemplifies that mathematics is a language to be spoken, an art to be seen, a music to be heard, and a dance to be performed.

 

Dr. Rebecca D. Eckert (Presentation PDF)

dr-rebecca-echert.jpgChallenging Talented Readers and Writers (Day 2, afternoon Keynote)

Rebecca D. Eckert, Ph.D., is an assistant clinical professor in the Neag School of Education at the University of Connecticut where she works with college students as they prepare to become teachers. In her former role as the Gifted Resource Specialist for the National Association for Gifted Children, Becky co-edited the book Designing Services and Programs for High-Ability Learners. Her previous work at The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented included participation with the research team that developed and implemented the Schoolwide Enrichment Reading Model (SEM-R) in elementary classrooms, and that work continues now with middle school students and their teachers. Her research interests include talented readers, recruitment and preparation of new teachers, arts in the schools, and public policy and gifted education. She is a former middle school teacher with experience teaching geography, history, and theatre arts.